Carleton University Art Gallery CUAG

CUAG Connects

Party celebrating the opening of CUAG’s winter exhibitions

Monday, 21 January 2019, 5:00 p.m.

CUAG invites you to a party celebrating the opening of our winter exhibitions: UPRISING: THE POWER OF MOTHER EARTH—Christi Belcourt—A Retrospective with Isaac Murdoch; Re: Working Together / Re: Travailler ensemble; and My Mom, kahntinetha Horn, the “Military Mohawk Princess.”

The party takes place at CUAG from 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. Opening remarks will take place at approximately 6:00 p.m. (with ASL interpretation). Admission is free and everyone is welcome!

CUAG is an accessible space with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.

Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for purchase at the tunnel entrance from 4:45 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Please see the visiting page of CUAG’s website for directions.

UPRISING: THE POWER OF MOTHER EARTH is a National Touring Exhibition co-produced by Thunder Bay Art Gallery and CUAG. Re: Working Together / Re: Travailler ensemble is co-produced by CUAG and GUQO. CUAG is grateful to Thunder Bay Art Gallery and GUQO for their wonderful work, vision and friendship in co-producing these exhibitions.

CUAG and GUQO have arranged a FREE bus for anyone travelling between Gatineau and Ottawa for the opening party!

Bus Schedule:
4:45 p.m.: Pick up at GUQO (101 Rue Saint-Jean-Bosco, Gatineau)
5:15 p.m.: Pick up at Ottawa Art Gallery (10 Daly Ave., Ottawa)
5:45 p.m.: Drop off at tunnel entrance closest to CUAG (St. Patrick’s Building, Carleton University)

7:00 p.m.: Pick up at tunnel entrance closest to CUAG
7:15 p.m.: Drop off at Ottawa Art Gallery
7:30 p.m.: Drop off at GUQO



Community Art Build with Christi Belcourt and Isaac Murdoch at Fenn Lounge (Residence Commons)

Tuesday, 22 January 2019, 11:00 a.m.

CUAG invites you to a Community Art Build, a participatory art-making event hosted by renowned artists Christi Belcourt and Isaac Murdoch.

This free, drop-in workshop takes place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Fenn Lounge, located in the Residence Commons Building at Carleton University.

We will work together with Belcourt and Murdoch to screen-print and paint banners for use in worldwide actions. All materials will be provided.

Fenn Lounge is an accessible room, with barrier-free washrooms.

The Art Build is held in conjunction with UPRISING: THE POWER OF MOTHER EARTH — Christi Belcourt — A Retrospective with Isaac Murdoch at Carleton University Art Gallery.

The Art Build is also part of the Mawandoseg Centre’s programming for Revitalizing Indigenous Strength and Education (RISE) month.



Conversation on Directions in Indigenous Curation: LaVallee / Martin / Printup / Robertson

Monday, 4 February 2019, 7:00 p.m.

CUAG invites you to a kitchen table conversation moderated by Dr. Carmen Robertson, Canada Research Chair in North American Art and Material Culture at Carleton University. Dr. Robertson has invited three First Nations curators to discuss their practices and the projects they feel are shaping directions in curation today.

Lee-Ann Martin will discuss her recent curatorial project Resilience, a national billboard project that coincided with Canada 150, Michelle LaVallee will discuss her pivotal exhibition Seven: Professional Native Indian Artists, Inc., and emerging curator Danielle Printup will discuss her exhibition Inaabiwin, which will be on view at the Ottawa Art Gallery in the fall of 2019.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.

Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for purchase at the tunnel entrance from 6:40 to 7:00 p.m. Please see the visiting page for directions

Michelle LaVallee is the director of the Indigenous Art Centre at Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. She was the curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery in Regina (2007-17), and has curated exhibitions for such galleries as A Space Gallery (Toronto), Gallery 101 (Ottawa), and The Clay and Glass Gallery (Waterloo). Her curatorial work has explored the colonial relations that have shaped historical and contemporary culture through exhibitions including: Moving Forward, Never Forgetting (2015); 13 Coyotes: Edward Poitras (2012); Blow Your House In: Vernon Ah Kee (2009); and Miss Chief: Shadow Catcher – Kent Monkman (2008).

Lee-Ann Martin is the former Curator of Contemporary Aboriginal Art at the Canadian Museum of History. She has held the positions of head curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery (1998–2000), First Peoples equity coordinator at the Canada Council for the Arts (1994–98) and curatorial fellow at the Walter Phillips Gallery (2001-03). In 1992, Martin co-curated, with Gerald McMaster, the internationally travelling exhibition INDIGENA: Perspectives of Indigenous Peoples on 500 Years. She has curated numerous exhibitions and published essays on critical issues in contemporary First Nations art in Canada. She holds a Master’s degree in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto.

Danielle Printup is an Ongwehonwe, Anishnabe-kwe from Kitigan Zibi Anishnabeg, QC, with maternal roots in Ohsweken, ON. She has a BA in Art History (2012) from the University of Guelph and interned at the National Gallery of Canada before completing the Aboriginal Training Program in Museum Practices at the Canadian Museum of History. Danielle has worked at Galerie SAW Gallery, the Indigenous Art Centre and the City of Ottawa’s Public Art Program. She is currently the Programs Assistant at Carleton University Art Gallery.

Dr. Carmen Robertson is the Canada Research Chair in North American Art and Material Culture in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, jointly appointed between the School for Studies in Art and Culture, the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies, and the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture. A Scots-Lakota professor of art history, her research centers around contemporary Indigenous arts and constructions of Indigeneity in popular culture. In 2016, Robertson published Norval Morrisseau: Art and Life and Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau: Art and the Colonial Narrative in the Canadian Media. She is a member of the board of governors for the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada and the Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society.



kahntinetha Horn and Kahente Horn-Miller in conversation with Carmen Robertson

Monday, 11 February 2019, 7:00 p.m.

Join Kahente Horn-Miller for a free, public dialogue with her mother, kahntinetha Horn, moderated by Carmen Robertson. The public life of kahntinetha Horn is the focus of Dr. Horn-Miller’s exhibition, My Mom, kahntinetha Horn, the “Military Mohawk Princess.” This conversation will unpack and explore the life and impact of this iconic Kanien’kehà:ka leader, activist, civil servant and former model.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! CUAG is an accessible space, with barrier-free washrooms and elevator.

Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale at the tunnel entrance from 6:45 to 7:00 p.m. Please see the visiting page for directions.

kahentinetha Horn was born in Brooklyn in 1940 and lived at Caughnawaga Indian Reserve (now Kahnawake), near Montreal, on and off through her youth. Often living away in cities where her father did ironwork. Horn started working as a model in the 1960s, turning this early attention into an activism fuelled by the destruction of her grandparents’ home at Caughnawaga in the 1950s, after the expropriation of their land for the St. Lawrence Seaway. She is a long-time political activist advocating for Kanien’kehà:ka sovereignty and Indigenous resource and treaty rights.

Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller (Kanien:keha’ka/Mohawk) received her doctorate in 2009. She is a mother to four daughters. She is an Assistant Professor in the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. As an active member of her community, Dr. Horn-Miller is a figurative bridge builder as she continues to research and write on issues that are relevant to her work and academic interests such as Indigenous methodologies, Indigenous women, identity politics, colonization, Indigenous governance, and consensus-based decision making for her community and the wider society.

Dr. Carmen Robertson is the Canada Research Chair in North American Art and Material Culture in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, jointly appointed between the School for Studies in Art and Culture, the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies, and the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture. A Scots-Lakota professor of art history, her research centers around contemporary Indigenous arts and constructions of Indigeneity in popular culture. In 2016, Robertson published Norval Morrisseau: Art and Life and Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau: Art and the Colonial Narrative in the Canadian Media. She is a member of the board of governors for the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada and the Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society.



Stonecroft Symposium: Working Together

Friday, 8 March 2019, 7:00 p.m.

CUAG and GUQO are co-hosting a free, public symposium on March 8 and 9, in conjunction with the current exhibition Re: Working Together / Re : Travailler ensemble, an ambitious exhibition that produces, embodies and explores collaboration. It features the work of artists Emmanuelle Léonard, Ahmet Öğüt, Redmond Entwistle, Hannah Jickling and Helen Reed, Mikhail Karikis, Kim Waldron, and Émilie Monnet, and runs concurrently at CUAG and GUQO.

The symposium will feature conversations and learning around collaboration as an artistic and curatorial practice. The symposium will featuring local thinkers, the artists of Re: Working Together / Re : Travailler ensemble and a keynote address by Mélanie Bouteloup, director of Bétonsalon in Paris. Together, participants and speakers will explore how to foster successful exchange between communities, artists and institutions.

More details to come!

The Stonecroft Symposium: Working Together is the second in a series of free annual symposia, held over the 2018-22 period. The series is made possible with a generous gift from the Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts. It enables CUAG to cultivate discussions of timely and relevant ideas raised by the artists who lead our programming, and to encourage open and reciprocal public exchange.

CUAG acknowledges with sincere gratitude the support of the Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts, which promotes education in the visual arts and fosters the public’s appreciation of the visual arts. 

Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts